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TraveLit--A blog about travel literature. 

     Even with the best of maps and instruments, we can never fully chart our journeys.

Travel Quotation

I wish I Married a Travel Junkie, by Samuel Jay Keyser--a travel-averse spouse married to an intrepid traveler--had been better written and edited, but in view of my own experience in New Guinea, I definitely responded to this observation:

"The average traveler when asked why he or she travels almost always responds with something like, "I want to experience someone else's culture. That's a red herring. How can you experience someone else's culture from an air-conditioned bus going 20 miles an hour through the streets of Pusan? All right. Get off the bus and walk through the fish market. You haven't experienced someone else's culture. All you've experienced is a lot of fish for sale. Most anthropologists spend years trying to get inside someone else's culture. Many of them come back home to a nervous breakdown for their efforts. Culture hopping isn't easy." Read More 
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Book Review

Crete
By Barry Unsworth. National Geographic, 2004, 170 pp.

Even for the Greeks of old, “Crete was the most venerable and ancient place imaginable,” says the novelist Barry Unsworth in his chronicle of a trip he took to the island with his wife one spring. According to myth, Crete was the birthplace of Zeus, and it was where Zeus later carried Europa, daughter of a Phoenician king, having seduced her in the shape of a bull. “Crete then, not only gave Europe its name, it was where Europe began,” he says, “a truth Cretans have always known.”

Writing with imagery that is evocative but not flamboyant, Unsworth conveys the antiquity—as well as the spirit—of this rugged island which abounds in caves, gorges, and magnificent views of the sea. Visiting ruins, Read More 

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Links of Interest

Four "newish" travel magazines noted by Wynelle Evans, a writer interested in travel. "Have not read the magazines themselves" yet, she says, but thought they might of interest:

Avaunt
Sidetracked
The Travel Almanac
Roads & Kingdoms

If you do take a look at these publications, please let readers here know what you think.
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Links of Interest

A list of favorite books from Ben Redmond (via Twitter):
The Best 11 Travel Books I Read in 2015
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Links of Interest

Longitude Books: Top ten BEST TRAVEL BOOKS OF THE YEAR
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Book Review

Shopping for Porcupine: A Life in Arctic Alaska.
By Seth Kantner. Milkweed Editions, 2008, 240 pp.

Many years ago, a student in my writing seminar, a young woman who had grown up in Barrow, Alaska, said that she wanted to write a memoir—but not about herself: she wanted to write a memoir about the tundra. I didn’t fully get it at the time, and she didn’t get far with her project, but after reading Kantner’s book and seeing his spectacular photographs—of wildlife, ice, and tundra—I now understand the grip this powerful landscape had on her.

Kantner was born in Arctic Alaska—in an igloo—the younger son of Howie and Erna, both originally from Ohio, who felt the pull of that landscape and moved there in the sixties to live, like the natives, off the land.  Read More 

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Links of Interest






Goodreads Book Giveaway




Lost Among the Baining by Gail Pool




Lost Among the Baining



by Gail Pool





Giveaway ends January 07, 2016.



See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.







Enter Giveaway



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Links of Interest

Singapore Old and New
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Book Review

North to Katahdin
By Eric Pinder. Milkweed Editions, 2005, 178 pp.

Katahdin—a name derived from the Abenaki Indian words kette adene, which is said to mean “greatest mountain”—is the highest point in Maine. It is also one end—for most thru-hikers, the endpoint—of the Appalachian Trail which extends 2160 miles to Georgia. In North to Katahdin, Eric Pinder rambles throughout the Katahdin region, ruminating on the mountain’s history and symbolism, and meditating on America’s relationship with wilderness.

Pinder takes as his starting point Henry David Thoreau’s 1846 visit to Katahdin, which he intended to climb but decided to abandon instead. Throughout the book, the author returns to this naturalist-philosopher, as he reflects on the popularity of mountain hiking today—an activity rare in Thoreau’s day—and wonders about the draw. “What is it—philosophically, aesthetically, and biologically—that attracts us to nature in the first place?” he asks. “Can the natural world still satisfy crowds in search of solitude?” Read More 

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Links of Interest

For some excellent,and beautifully illustrated, articles on tribal art and anthropology--a distinctive kind of travel--take a look at Detours des Mondes
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